• Cardiometabolic Management

    Endocrine Consultants also has over 40 years treating pituitary and gestational diabetes!

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  • Endocrine

    Experienced professionals treating difficult Endocrine and Thyroid disorders.

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  • Retinopathy Diabetes

    Experienced Pre-Diabetic care and comprehensive analysis

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  • Pediatric Endocrinology

    Experienced Pediatric Endocrinology with Obesity/Nutrition.

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  • Insulin Resistance and Clinical Trials

    Experienced research team working challenging insulin cases.

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FAQs

Q?What are some long term effects of diabetes?
A.

Diabetes can lead to serious problems such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, amputations, nerve damage and kidney disease. It is important to take care of yourself by taking your medicine, being active and eating a healthy diet.

Q?FAQs What is Diabetes?
A.

Diabetes is a disease in which sugar builds up in the blood. People with diabetes can have heart, kidney, eye problems and other related complications. What is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes?  Type 1 diabetes mostly occurs in children and teens. The body doesn’t make any insulin at all. Type 2 diabetes mostly occurs in adults. The body still makes insulin, but not enough for what the body needs. How do you get diabetes?  Type 2 diabetes is caused by poor diet, excess weight, and not being physically active. How can you treat diabetes?  Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin. For type 2 diabetes, both insulin and pills can be used, depending on each patient. Exercise, healthy eating and weight loss also are part of the treatment. What is insulin?  Insulin is a chemical made in the pancreas. It helps control sugar levels in the blood. What are some long term effects of diabetes?  Diabetes can lead to serious problems such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, amputations, nerve damage and kidney disease. It is important to take care of yourself by taking your medicine, being active and eating a healthy diet. What are risk factors for developing diabetes?  The causes and risks for type 1 diabetes are still unknown. The most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes is being overweight. Other risks include older age, lack of exercise, family history, race (it’s more common in people of Aboriginal, African, Asian or Latin American descent) high blood pressure and cholesterol. What are some ways to prevent getting type 2 diabetes?  The best way to try to prevent type 2 diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight through diet and exercise. Other helpful things are to eat nutritious foods low in fat and sugar and to stay active through exercise. If you think you might be at risk for diabetes, you should talk to you doctor about the best way to prevent the disease. How many people have diabetes?

The best way to try to prevent type 2 diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight through diet and exercise. Other helpful things are to eat nutritious foods low in fat and sugar and to stay active through exercise. If you think you might be at risk for diabetes, you should talk to you doctor about the best way to prevent the disease.

Q?What is osteoporosis?
A.

Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones gradually become thin and lose mass. This causes the bones to become frail and break more easily. Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease in America, affecting about 10 million people.

Q?How do patients who have failure of their pituitary glands live without these hormones?
A.

We have synthetic hormones that patients take either by mouth or injection to replace the missing hormones from the malfunctioning pituitary gland.

Q?Do pituitary tumors spread to other parts of the body, like so many other tumors?
A.

No, pituitary tumors are usually benign. They grow very slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body.

Q?What are the symptoms of low blood sugar?
A.

Signs include shaking, fast heartbeat, sweating, anxiety, dizziness, hunger, impaired vision, weakness/fatigue, headache and irritability.

Q?What are the symptoms of high blood sugar?
A.

Signs include extreme thirst, frequent urination, dry skin, hunger, blurred vision, drowsiness and nausea.

Q?If I have gestational diabetes, what should my blood sugar level be?
A.

Your blood sugar level should be between 60 and 90 mg/dl when you have been fasting and less than 120 mg/dl two hours after a meal.

Q?How often should I check blood sugar level?
A.

Blood sugar levels should be checked at least twice each day.

Q?What should my blood sugar level be?
A.

Blood sugar levels change all the time and vary with each individual. The American Diabetes Association recommends the following: after fasting, your blood sugar should be between 80 and 120 mg/dl; before meals, it should be less than 140 mg/dl; and two hours after a meal, it should be less than 180 mg/dl.

Q?What is the recommended daily amount of fiber I should eat?
A.

The recommended amount of fiber is 25 to 30 grams per day. Check for fiber on food labels to help reach this number. Some examples of high fiber foods are fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains. Fiber is not completely digested and absorbed in the intestinal system, and it is unavailable as blood sugar. Therefore, a high-fiber meal does not provide as much available carbohydrates as a similar-content low fiber meal. To avoid constipation, increase water intake as more fiber is added to the diet.

Q?How does Blood Sugar work in the body ?
A.

Here’s how blood sugar works in the body. Glucose (blood sugar) circulates in the blood after food is absorbed in the intestine. A small amount normally combines with the hemoglobin molecule (A1c). Hemoglobin is the red-colored protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the rest of the body. It operates in direct proportion to the amount of glucose in the blood. The glucose remains with the hemoglobin molecule until the individual’s red blood cells die – usually between two and three months. When the patient’s blood is analyzed for hemoglobin A1c, the resulting value number provides an estimate of the level of glucose over that time period.

Q?What is CardioMetaobolic
A.

This the Cardio Rate

Q?What is hemoglobin A1c?
A.

This is a type of blood test. A hemoglobin A1c percentage is important because it is the only way to know how well patients are controlling their diabetes over time. Based on blood tests taken over a period of two or three months, doctors can estimate patients’ average blood sugar levels. The goal for most diabetics is an A1c of less than 7%. This is roughly equivalent to an average blood sugar level of about 150 mg/dl. An A1c of 9% indicates an average blood sugar level of about 210 mg/dl.

 

Q?How do I properly treat a low blood sugar reaction? Should I eat a chocolate bar to bring my sugar back up?
A.

Chocolate is not usually the best choice because the fat in it slows down the absorption of the sugar. Treat a low blood sugar reaction with some type of fast-acting sugar, such as glucose tabs, four ounces of juice, four ounces of nonfat milk or a half can of regular soda.

Q?What foods should I avoid to help control my diabetes?
A.

Foods with higher amounts of simple sugars should be avoided, such as fruit juice, regular soda, sport drinks, candies, sugar, brown sugar, honey, syrup, jelly and jams.

Q?What should I check on food labels sugar or total carbohydrates?
A.

Total carbohydrates include sugar, starches and dietary fiber. The total amount of carbohydrates is what affects blood glucose levels – not just sugar.

Q?How much salt or sodium can I have if I am also taking blood pressure medication?
A.

Patients who take blood pressure medication should limit sodium intake to 2,000 mg a day. One teaspoon of salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Most sodium in the American diet comes from processed or prepared foods, not from the kitchen table salt shaker. Foods that have 400 mg per serving are considered high sodium foods.